Products

Filter Separators and Coalescers

ETI provides treatment systems to process and remove particulates and liquids from gas streams. The process equipment consists of standalone vessels or skid-mounted modules.

 


Twin ETI Filter Separators, each handling 250 MMSCFD ahead of dehydration equipment.

 

The components of a filter separator/coalescer require a vessel to house the filter elements, a quick opening closure, the filter elements and mist extraction. The differences between whether a filter is a separator or a coalescer depends upon the direction of gas flow through the filter elements and the presence of pre- or post-mist elimination devices. Mist elimination devices are principally vane sections, double-pocket-vane or single-vane packs or mesh pads, or combo-vane-mesh packs.

Reasons for a Filter Separator or Filter Coalescer
The principal contaminants removed in filter separators are solid particulates, mill scales, rust, dust, formation fines, corrosion by-products, paraffins, asphaltenes, and small amounts of liquid condensates. The principal liquid contaminants removed in coalescing filters are water, hydrocarbons, and compressor lube oils. The principle solid contaminants removed in filter separators are mill scales, rust, dust, formation fines, corrosion by-products, paraffins and asphaltenes. In each filter vessel there are five basic features: primary separation, filtration, secondary separation, mist extractor, and controlled liquid discharge. A horizontal, double-barrel filter separator and a vertical filter coalescer are illustrated below. Dry gas filters do not have a liquid discharge.

 

Primary
Separation
Filtration
Element
Secondary
Separation
Mist
Extractor
Controlled
Discharge
DBFS Inlet Section Outside-In
Flow
Coalescing
Section
Vane/Mesh Two Dumps
VFC Lower KO
Drum
Inside-Out
Flow
Below
Elements
Vane Bottom
Section
Two Dumps

 

In both of these examples, the vessel could just as likely have been configured vertically or horizontally. When arranged vertically, the flow enters the bottom KO section where free liquids/slugs separate; when arranged horizontally, flow enters the standoff gas distributors where free liquids/slugs accumulate and drain to a lower-smaller barrel.  In horizontal configurations, large slugs of liquids require sizing the lower barrel for the size of the slug.

The particulate removal can be from 0.3 micron to 5 microns. Liquid droplet removal requires coalescing the liquid prior to separation.